Shadow Clock

 Jennifer McMillan

Shadow Clock is illustrated by the shadows cast by a female body and poetically personifies time by travelling through the history and collections of Tullie House.

Using video, light, and projection I challenge our perception of time and the way we feel time. Using the shadows projected from my body I have created a clock. Shadow Clock also poetically personifies time by travelling through the history and eras of the collections of Tullie House. During the exhibition, the audience will be invited to create their own shadow clocks. These shadow clocks will be recorded and composed to create a collective clock as a way of archiving the time given to Tullie House from its audience.  

As an artist I am interested in the expectations forced upon society and the idea of femininity. I seek to discover how social constructs of femininity are embedded in culture, art and time. In particular, I am interested in ideas of temporality, ownership and possession, and the ways in which these ideas have become associated with femininity. 

Through the manipulation of light, shadow and time Shadow Clock questions our control over what we observe. The personification of time explores the history and eras of the collections of Tullie House. It also explores feelings, perceptions and definitions of time. 

The ‘collective shadow clock’, that the audience is invited to create and participate in will be a composition of collective video recordings, will visually represent an archive of the time given to Tullie House from its audience.  

Jennifer McMillan is an artist currently based in Ulverston, Cumbria and currently completing her MA in Contemporary Art Practice at the Royal College of Art. She is interested in the relationships between the body and environments to explore our place in society.

In 2017 McMillan was Artist in Residence for Culture Vultures, Sefrou, Morocco. She has exhibited work for Up North Arts in Lancaster, performed for Hope Street Limited’s On the Verge Festival in Liverpool and for Fringe World Festival in Perth, Australia.

Her practice combines social interaction, sculpture and performance to examine stigmas of body image, perception and expectation; specifically, how stigma can create social-constructions and barriers in both culture and art.

McMillan aims to keep her audience in a juxtaposed state of discomfort and ease, balancing intimidation and endearment as a tactic of control. Her work is experimental, interested in femininity, gender perceptions, science fiction, time and the body.

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Source is a development lab for emerging Cumbrian Artists working alongside Cumbrian Cultural Organisations, artists and curators. Led by Signal Film and Media in partnership with Cumbria Museum Consortium.

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